अष्टाश्रि यूप in a यज्ञ कुण्ड Binjor dated to ca. 2500 BCE. Significance of the discovery for Vedic and civilization studies

Mirror: http://tinyurl.com/zkwyh7s

अष्टाश्रि यूप in a यज्ञ कुण्ड Binjor dated to ca. 2500 BCE. Significance of the discovery for Vedic and civilization studies

Abstract

A breath-taking discovery has been reported in April 2015 by students of Institute of Archaeology, National Museum, New Delhi which has profound implications for Vedic and civilization studies.

The discovery is a अष्टाश्रि यूप in a यज्ञ कुण्ड of archaeological site Binjor (4MSR) dated to ca. 2500 BCE. The location of Binjor is significant. It is on the banks of Vedic River Sarasvati close to Anupgarh, about 7 kms. from the border of Pakistan.

Together with the अष्टाश्रि यूप ‘octagonal pillar’, a seal has also been found with Harappa (Indus) Script signifying metalwork.

The presence of अष्टाश्रि यूप ‘octagonal pillar’ is consistent with the details provided in ancient Vedic texts of Rigveda, Taittiriya Samhita and Satapatha Brahmana describing the caṣāla (which also signifies snout of a boar, varāha), as godhuma atop the Yupa as the Vajra which carburizes (infuses carbon into) the soft metal and makes the smelted metal hard.

This discovery has profound implications for Veda traditional continuum in Bharat and even in East Borneo, for the definitive Vedic cultural framework of over 2000 civilizational sites on the banks of Vedic River Sarasvati, the decipherment of Harappa (Indus) Script as a data archive of metalwork catalogues along a Seafaring Maritime Tin Route from Hanoi to Haifa which existed at least 2 millennia before the Silk Road.

Significance of the discovery for Vedic and civilization studies

Significance of the breath-taking discovery in April 2015 of यज्ञ कुण्ड of Binjor on the banks of Vedic River Sarasvati dated to ca. 2500 BCE by students of Institute of Archaeology, National Museum, Delhi is explained in the following sections:

Section A. Identification of Soma as metal in the context of Indus Script Corpora as metalwork catalogues

Section B. Vedic River Sarasvati, अहम् राष्ट्री संगमनी वसूनाम् I am the mover of nation’s wealth: देवता आत्मा, ऋषिका वाक् आम्भृणी  (RV 10.125)

Section C. Binjor yupa inscription on Indus Script seal is यष्ट्वा बहुसुवर्णकम् सोमः-संस्था

Octagonal yupa is mentioned as aṣṭāśri in Taittiriya Samhita and Satapatha Brahmana as a proclamation of the performance of Soma Samsthā yāga. During historical periods, 19 such octagonal yupa have been found (in Rajasthan, Allahabad and even in East Borneo — Mulavarman inscription) together with inscriptions documenting performance of one or more types of  Soma Samsthā yāga. This continuum is of phenomenal significance attesting to the presence of cultural framework in the Veda tradition as early as ca. 2500 BCE in Binjor (this date is consistent with the mature phase of the civilization with thousands of seals with Harappa Script inscriptions).

The presence of अष्टाश्रि यूप ‘octagonal pillar’ is consistent with the details provided in ancient Vedic texts of Rigveda, Taittiriya Samhita and Satapatha Brahmana describing the caṣāla (which also signifies snout of a boar, varāha), as godhuma atop the Yupa as the Vajra which carburizes (infuses carbon into) the soft metal and makes the smelted metal hard.

The surprising conclusion from the decipherment using the cipher of Meluhha cipher is that the entire Harappa Script Corpora are metalwork catalogues used in data archiving of metalwork and exchange transactions with neighbouring civilizational areas.

Read on…Mirror: http://tinyurl.com/zkwyh7s

S. Kalyanaraman

Sarasvati Research Center

Nov. 23, 2016

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